No books, no pencils, no shoes

Author – Jman

We have a teacher who requires that students come prepared for class by having their book and pencil. Those without these things are to borrow them from the teacher and leave a shoe as collateral (one shoe per item borrowed). Students needing materials would take off their shoes and put them in a black box by the teachers desk marked “shoe jail.” Students would then get their books and pencils and when pencils are books were returned, they would get their shoes back.

Some students did not like this policy and so they would simply just go without books and pencils. The teacher began to notice this and so one day she did a book and pencil check. Everyone had to hold their book and pencil in their hands to show that they had them. Those who did not have pencils or books were then told to take off their shoes and hold them up. The teacher came and collected the shoes of the unprepared students and put them in the shoe jail and gave them books and pencils for them to borrow. This was going to be the procedure at the start of each class. Students who did not have a book and pencil to hold up at pencil check would have to hold up a shoe in order to borrow a pencil. The slogan was that if you are not prepared for class then be prepared to take off your shoes.

Usually there were a few each day that forgot pencils and had to give up their shoes. The teacher would be able to collect all shoes without trouble as she was able to handle them all. One day we decided that we were all going to forget our books and pencils on the same day. It was time for pencil check and everyone in the class took off their shoes to exchange them for books and pencils. The teacher did her best to bundle all the shoes in her arms but kept dropping them as she transported them to the shoe jail.

We then decided to do the same thing the next day. The third time we all forgot our pencils on the same day, she realized that we were doing this on purpose.

The fourth day we did this, the joke was on us. We were sitting there without our shoes on and there was an evacuation drill. We had to leave the building in our stocking feet. We proceeded to the grassy field which was wet from a recent rain. We stood there with wet grass and mud clinging to our white socks. The whole thing was fun. It probably won’t be the last time we don’t bring a pencil to class

5 thoughts on “No books, no pencils, no shoes

  1. Dear god I love shoe confiscation rules at school, though watched happened if you lost the borrowed pencils, and what happened to your shoes afterwards?

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    • I don’t recall anyone losing the borrowed pencils. There were a few people who failed to return the borrowed pencils and reclaim their shoes. Shoeless feet were to be a reminder that we had the teacher’s borrowed pencil but some people still forgot this and left the room in their socks. I don’t k now if they realized it later and reclaimed their shoes. If the pencils were not returned then the shoes became the property of the school. There were offenses such as walking on the gym floor with street shoes where the shoes were forfeited and these shoes would be donated to charity or they school would have a shoe auction and sell the confiscated shoes.

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      • Ah I see, well atleast the shoes went to a good cause, though I myself would think of other reasons to lose your shoes, like running in the school halls, forgetting homework, coming to class late and such.

        Granted I also think that there should be a three strike system with this, though not for the gymnasium since you would damage the floor there.

        The first strike leads to you losing your shoes for the rest of the day, or for the next day if late enough.

        The second strike would have you lose your shoes for three days, and you have to go to and from school in your socks.

        And the third strike meant your shoes belonged to the school to be ether sold, ground up or donated.

        (Though before you ask forgetting your homework more than once doesn’t count as an extra strike but just extends the punishment by a day each time.)

        Strikes are reset at the start of a new week though if your acting a multi day shoe confiscation starting on Friday, then your shoes won’t be returned for the weekend.

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  2. I like your three strikes system for losing shoes. I have always felt that losing something is a good form of punishment.

    I would add to your three strikes in the following way.

    Each time a shoe is confiscated a mark like an x would be placed on it.

    Strike one: Shoes are confiscated for 24 hours from time of breaking the rules. If rule is broken at 11:15 shoes are given back at 11:15 the next day. Student goes home in socks. For being late for class shoes are taken for one day for each minute late. For walking on gym floor with street shoes, running in the hall, fighting, kicking or destroying property, shoes are immediately forfeited to the school.

    When shoes receive a second strike students must be in socks for the assigned amount of time and serve a detention to get their shoes back. If detention is not served, the shoes belong to the school.

    Strike three: The shoes belong to the school. At the end of the term all the forfeited shoes would be auctioned off.

    Strikes would never be reset. If student gets a new pair of shoes after losing a pair, then the next offense would be strike one for that pair of shoes.

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    • Hm I guess that would work, sadly I always saw detention as a waste of time that would just cause the student to rebound and do it again, which is why I invented my three strike system for the fantasy story I am putting up on my deviantart page. (I go by the name MamoruFumio there)

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